Tuesday, 1 November 2016

The Bible, Religion and Spiritual Teachings

Introduction \nThe script discourse appears in the Bible. The Greek dialegomai occurs 13 times in the naked Testament, and refers to reason, rational argument, discussion, discourse, debate, dispute and so forth. Particularly, we often see it apply to the Apostle Paul as he reas adeptd and argued with Jews in the synagogues (Acts 17:2,17, 18:4,19, 19:8) and Greeks and opposite Gentiles in the market coifs and academies of the time, where the exchange of ideas took place (Acts 17:17, 18:4, 19:9-10). \nSt. Pauls evangelistic preaching wasnt exactly thrilling oratory and edifying, homiletical exposition; it involved in- perspicaciousness reasoning; even - at times, such as on Mars Hill (Acts 17:22-34) --, liter entirelyy philosophical discourse. \nOur ennoble Jesus, too, often engaged in vigorous, rational, scriptural argument, especially with the Pharisees, practically in the spirit of the antique rabbis. One example of this among umteen occurs in Mark 12:18-27, where He is said to be disputing (Greek, suzeteo) with the Sadducees (cf. Acts 9:29, where the similar word is used). \nRational argument, thinking, or open-minded discourse and dialogue is only permissible; indeed, required of all Christians who wish to have a robust, confident, reasonable faith amidst the competing ideas and faiths of the humankind and academia. Our Lord instructs us to shaft God with our minds as nearly as with all our hearts, souls, and metier (Luke 10:27). \nThe word apologetics; that is, the defense team of Christianity (or Catholicism in particular, in the present instance) is derived etymologically from the Greek apologia, which name was used by Plato as a title of one of his many classic dialogues, in description of the philosopher Socrates lengthy and inflate defense or plea of himself against trumped-up, politically-motivated charges in Athens, in 399 B.C. \n apologia is also a biblical word, and appears much in the same sense as with Socrates, with call f or to St. Pauls defense of himself ...